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Friday, November 14, 2008

Friday Mieography


This lady is a new one to me. Her name is Emily Greene Balch. She was born in Boston, Mass. to a prosperous family, her father was a lawyer. She went to private schools as a child, and was in the first graduating class for Bryn Mawr College. After graduating, she did an independent study of sociology, and she had also been awarded a European Fellowship to study economics in Paris for a year. She also took scattered courses at Harvard, the University of Chicago, and another full year of economics in Berlin, Germany. She eventually joined the faculty at Wellesley College, and rose to the rank of professor of economics, and sociology. She was an outstanding teacher, with lots of compassion for the underpriviledged, strong mindedness, and she insisted that that her students should formulate their own independent judgements with research. She was a member of two municipal boards, (children, and urban planning) and two state commissions (industrial education, and immigration) and she participated in different events for womens suffrage, racial justice, control of child labor, and better wages and conditions for labor. She was also very actively involved in the peace movement.
After the breakout of WW I, she became convinced that her lifework lay in the peace movement, specifically, riding the world of war. (She must be rolling over in her grave). She was a delegate to the International Congress of Women at the Hague in 1915, and played a prominent role in several important projects. She founded an organization called the Women's International Committee for Permanent Peace, which was later named the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She worked tirelessly, preparing peace proposals, she served in a delegation sponsored by congress to the Scandinavian countries and Russia to urge their government to initiate mediation with the warring countries, and worked in writing in collaboration with Jane Addams and Alice Hamilton to write "Women At The Hague:The International Congress of Women and Its Results."
After she returned to the US, she campaigned actively against America's entry into the war. She had been on a leave of absence from Wellesley, but they terminated her. She accepted a position on the editorial staff of a liberal weekly magazine called "the Nation" and wrote some pieces for them. She went to the second convention of the International Congress of Women, in Zurich, Switzerland, and accepted a position to become it's secretary. She did this twice in her life, without a salary. She also spent her time working on many League of Nations projects, such as disarmament, the internationalization of aviation, and drug control.
In 1946, she received the Nobel Peace Prize. (She donated the cash of it to the Women's League of Peace and Freedom). She was Seventy-Nine, and in frail health. Despite this, she continued to work. She also liked to paint, and write poetry. Her poetry was published, "The miracle of Living".
She died at age Ninety Four and one day old.

7 comments:

david mcmahon said...

She was right. There is no greater miracle than living .....

sybil law said...

What an accomplished woman!

Daryl said...

Congrats on making David's Post of the Day .. and for once again shining a light on someone fascinating ..

94 and 1 day ..

My dad died at 91 and 2 days ...


:-Daryl

Eaton Bennett said...

An extraordinary woman to say the least. I'm going to google her poetry
and life is a gift too important to
waste. :)

richies said...

It is always great to learn about someone you have never heard of. Thank you for the info.

An Arkie's Musings

Moannie said...

Thanking you for shining a light on another wonderful person.

Bubblewench said...

A good PA woman! Nice. Finally catching up on your blog